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Health insurance, employer and confidentiality

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Does any of you know the mechanics of health insurance and the amount of information exchanged between employers and insurance companies. I'm presently under the public insurance regime. But I'm obligated to change to collective insurance as soon as I'm hired by a company that offers it. I don't want to share my diagnosis with my employer, my industry is small and I'm ambitious. According to the law I don't have to divulge it during the hiring process. But can they find out later? Thanks in advance.

This would be heavily dependant on where you live.

My private health insurance company do not share anything with my employer about my medical history - however my employer knows about my CML, I've never hidden it.

There seem to be a whole range of issues here and the key one as I see is about confidentiality of medical records and data sharing.In many environments/countries clinicians will not release an individuals medical history or current situation without the patients consent 

In the UK for instance no medical practitioner will release my personal medical information to my relatives not even my partner,not to my private insurance company nor to my employer without my consent.However if I put in a claim from a travel insurer or to my private health insurer (for a new condition or a new claim) then the insurer will seek access to my historical medical records via my consent; this is to check for instance that on joining the insurance scheme or on taking out insurance that I declared truthfully all previous medical conditions .

In terms of data sharing in some countries there are huge penalties for ignoring data protection laws or for sharing privileged  data to a third party;perhaps you need to check the small print with your future insurer.

Like David said it depends on which country you are from and the legal situation there.It will also depend on the nature of your health insurance and to what extent it is employment linked-in some countries you will only get insured or get good medical insurance if you are in employment for instance.

Re declaring your condition prior to interview for a job that  is your choice;in some countries like UK as soon as you have cancer under the Equality Act you are defined as disabled. In addition when in  employment your employer by law has to make reasonable provisions for your disability/condition.

In some countries small sized employers are not able or are not willing to make provision for those who are suffering a medical condition and at the extreme time off for medical appointments are taken out of annual leave.

If you have a friend who is an employment lawyer seek pre advice I suggest

Regards

John

Hi David & john,

Laws here are very similar to the UK. I will clearly be a burden for any small to medium company out there. Big uptick in their premium and my fellow colleagues will take the brunt of it. I don't want any scandal or suing if they suspect and fire me that's why I'm asking. If it's a big company, it won't matter. 

My pivot nurse recently divulged my diagnosis to a stranger. We still don't know who. He called it professional courtesy to a colleague that called to ask a question lol Data privacy laws work when people understand them. I was taken off his care immediately.

HR d├ępartement can also be very chatty. A company I postulated for is notorious for that. For now I'm not concerned about time off my treatment is going splendidly, knock on wood. I'll consult an employement lawyer, great idea  the investment will be worth my while seeing as they can tell me more about the regional practices regarding heath insurance.

 

Cheers! 

Zaccar,

Are you in the USA? I am, and didn't declare the CML to my employer on hire (rightly or wrongly). My employer is quite large and my insurance goes through BCBS so there is quite a large pool of people to spread the risk.

From my experience, my employer is primarily focused on whether my dependents are eligible for coverage on the family plan and any medical issues are between me and the insurer.

I seem to recall cancer is a protected condition, so there is possible recourse if you were let go as a result of that - proving it is a different matter.

Zaccar,

Are you in the USA? I am, and didn't declare the CML to my employer on hire (rightly or wrongly). My employer is quite large and my insurance goes through BCBS so there is quite a large pool of people to spread the risk.

From my experience, my employer is primarily focused on whether my dependents are eligible for coverage on the family plan and any medical issues are between me and the insurer.

I seem to recall cancer is a protected condition, so there is possible recourse if you were let go as a result of that - proving it is a different matter.

Hey cdw500,

To me not telling your employer was the right choice. I don't know your rationale but here's mine. A Lot of people are diagnosed while in a career with a clear path  or ending ,with an employer they have already proven their value to . I'm not looking for advantages due to my conditions, I just  want to be treated like everyone else that's it. CML won't affect my productivity so ethically I don't have no qualms about it.

I'm in Canada . I am aware that laws protect against discrimination when it comes down to medical conditions. Thanks for confirming my suspicions with large companies being less affected when it comes to the prices of our medications.

Employers are very savvy, if they want to fire you without consequences they have tricks under theirs bags and I'm sure they're very knowledgeable of employment laws.

What I'm the most worried about is the news spreading in my very niche industry. Leukemic cancer patient is a very heavy label to carry around and it might scare people off. I'm sure That's why you didn't say anything. 

Your post is reassuring, if they don't have ways to find it's perfect for me. I don't care if they know that I increased their premium, I don't want them to know why ;) Just for a few years, Tasigna patent expires in July 2023. By then, It won't matter. This is a huge deal for me, I was thinking about switching to generic imatinib and paying for it myself. I'll consult a lawyer, but with your post I know I'm good.

Thanks Zaccar.